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Rbc infinite privilege rbc banque royale en ligne

Last year Visa launched the RBC Royal Bank in Canada in 2008 by Invitation only. This card was launched prior to the other ultra exclusive Canadian Black Card, American Express’ Centurion Card launched in December 2008. The RBC Royal Bank Visa Infinite Black Card is: *Invitation only *1 Million CAD in Liquid Assets, Net Worth of 3 Million CAD or . * Annual Fees $399 per year for Private Banking clients, $599 for non-Private Banking clients. * RBC Rewards redemption rate of 2% instead of 1% for all travel rewards, all flight classes (no blackout periods or seat restrictions) * Visa Infinite Concierge Service (Virtuoso) * Complimentary Priority Pass membership (the $99 annual fee version) * Complimentary Tablet Plus membership (usual fee $195) * Complimentary access to Zagat® restaurant ratings and reviews * Dedicated customer support number for Visa Infinite clients only. ASC=3E2007&utm_campaign=365_Credit Cards_Avion_IAV_LAL_EN&utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_content=&utm_dc=ks_SOF_23843805861410783_23843805861920783_23843993969480783_fb_Facebook_Mobile_Feed Expiry: Jan 10, 2020 Apply for a RBC Visa Infinite Avion Card now, and you can earn 15,000 welcome points upon approval plus no annual fee for the first year, plus earn 10000 extra points with a minimum spend (spend $1,000 or more within 3 months of account opening). Rbc infinite privilege royal bank of canada near me An RBC Avion Visa Infinite Privilege card has been issued at the request of the applicant or the co-applicant. An authorized user must be a permanent resident of Canada. RBC ® Avion ® Visa Infinite Business ‡. Designed to meet the ever-evolving needs of your business, your card acts as a business cash flow solution, providing you with the purchasing power, expense management support, travel privileges and insurance coverage * you need, so you can spend more time doing what you do best – running your business. Rewards Canada reader and Meet the Collector Charles T. forwarded to us a letter from TD letting him know that the Fairmont President's Club Elevated Status benefit that comes with his TD Aeroplan Visa Infinite Privilege card will be discontinued. This means cards issued by TD, CIBC and RBC are all affected by this change. Unfortunate to see another benefit being taken away from what are the highest end Visa cards in the Canadian market but there may other factors in play here. As you may or may not be aware of, Fairmont Hotels was bought out by French based Accor Hotels. Accor has their own loyalty program called Le Club Accor Hotels and recently the moves on their part seem to be indicating the near end of Fairmont's President's Club program. If this is really the case it could explain why this benefit is being removed from the Visa Infinite Privilege program. A further confirmation of this would be if the benefit is pulled from The Platinum Card from American Express - which it hasn't been, yet. CIBC just released their new Aventura Visa Infinite Privilege card. Get 50,000 av points after $3k spend within 4 months, not bad, but you cannot book flights outside of N. Was curious about the travel credit so poked in the T&C's, which indicate that the $200 travel credit is given per calendar year, resetting January 1. 499 annual fee 200 annual travel credit 120 annual fee rebate with Smart Plus 3 points on travel purchased through CIBC Rewards 2 points on dining, entertainment, transportation, gas and groceries 1.25 points on everything else https://com/en/personal-bankin ... Not a truly competitive card overall IMO (especially with the income requirement) but could be something to consider for someone currently banking at CIBC ($200 travel credit $120 annual waiver with the smart account brings it down to *effectively* $179. Unless they don't check and don't care, not many people will qualify. The 6 PP lounge visits is good, but you also get 4 visits with the Infinite card. Saw this earlier checking out CIBC's refreshed 'winter' offers. If you want to RFD math it with the $200 credit available twice in the card membership year, you are *technically* ahead. On a side note, from the appearance of the card, it looks like the card is following the flat card, numbers on the back trend. I for one love this design change (fits much easier in the wallet). CIBC has two Infinite Privilege cards now - this one and the Aeroplan one. I wonder if post-2020 they will still have the Aeroplan one, along with TD, or if they are migrating to this being their Infinite Privilege card? This primarily competes with the RBC Avion Visa Infinite Privilege I would think. The card offers Primary rental car insurance, which I thought was unusual in Canada (and good! ) A – COVERAGE Car Rental Collision/Loss Damage Insurance provides coverage, for theft, loss or damage to the rental car up to the actual cash value of the rental car and valid rental agency loss of use charges subject to the terms and conditions of the certificate. This coverage applies only to your personal and business use of the rental car. There is no deductible for the coverage under this certifcate. This insurance is primary insurance, except for losses that may be waived or assumed by the rental agency or its insurer, and in such circumstances where local government insurance legislation states otherwise. CIBC has two Infinite Privilege cards now - this one and the Aeroplan one. I wonder if post-2020 they will still have the Aeroplan one, along with TD, or if they are migrating to this being their Infinite Privilege card? This primarily competes with the RBC Avion Visa Infinite Privilege I would think. *** The one thing I noticed reading the agreements that is perhaps a first in Canada is that the car rental insurance is primary insurance. I do not know of any other card in Canada that offers this. cards offer Primary rental car insurance (Chase Bank offers it with their Sapphire Preferred card as I recall). Rental car insurance from cards is always listed as secondary insurance, meaning one has to file a claim with one's own car insurance company first, and the card insurance is there to pay what they won't pay. As I said, I don't know of any Canadian cards that offer primary insurance for rental cars. "A – COVERAGE Car Rental Collision/Loss Damage Insurance provides coverage, for theft, loss or damage to the rental car up to the actual cash value of the rental car and valid rental agency loss of use charges subject to the terms and conditions of the certifcate. This coverage applies only to your personal and business use of the rental car. There is no deductible for the coverage under this certifcate. This insurance is primary insurance, except for losses that may be waived or assumed by the rental agency or its insurer, and in such circumstances where local government insurance legislation states otherwise." If one takes the rental car company's insurance, it is primary insurance, meaning that one doesn't have to involve one's personal car insurance company in the claim. Now, with the CIBC card, one can decline that and still have primary insurance. The CIBC reward search tool for travel is not very easy to use. Is Car Rental Loss and Damage Insurance primary or secondary insurance? About 10 years ago I was in an accident while driving a rental car (paid with my TD First Class Visa Infinite and declined the rental agency CDW), and I'm pretty sure I didn't file a claim with my own insurance, only called the number listed in the card's certificate of insurance, and gave them the details. It also doesn't know of your travel credit, you have to call to try to make use of the travel credit. S., the vast majority of cards require one to file a claim with one's own insurance first. Amex Platinum Card only offers secondary coverage (not primary) - from the Amex U. Car Rental Loss and Damage Insurance is a secondary insurance plan. Amex Centurion Card doesn't offer primary rental car insurance (and they are hiking the U. Centurion Card annual fee from $2,500 to $5,000 next year): "Secondary Coverage. Scotia AMEX Gold also seems it's a primary insurance https:// ... When trying to book flights, it doesn't know any city outside of N America. Some Chase cards offer primary car insurance, but most cards only offer secondary coverage. This means it reimburses the Card Member only for losses/expenses not covered by other plans, such as a partial collision damage waiver, any personal auto insurance, employer's auto insurance or reimbursement plan or other sources of insurance or indemnity." https:// ... This Plan is secondary to all other valid and collectible insurance or other sources of indemnity and shall apply only when such other benefits are exhausted. df#page=86 CLD insurance is primary insurance which pays the amount for which You are liable to the rental agency up to the actual cash value of the damaged or stolen vehicle as well as any valid and documented Loss of Use, reasonable and customary towing charges, and administration charges resulting from damage or theft occurring while the rental vehicle is rented in Your name. So as a travel card, it doesn't handle travel very well. We will pay only that portion of the loss benefit which is not reimbursed by other collectible insurance or other sources of indemnity, up to Our limits, as provided under the Description of Benefits section." https://icm.aexp-static.com/Internet/Ce ... This includes damage resulting from malicious vandalism and theft. If you and spouse each have Smart Plus account, you can each get a infinite card with the fee waived, and get your respective aventura points and travel credit, and 4 Priority Pass lounge visits. About 10 years ago I was in an accident while driving a rental car (paid with my TD First Class Visa Infinite and declined the rental agency CDW), and I'm pretty sure I didn't file a claim with my own insurance, only called the number listed in the card's certificate of insurance, and gave them the details. Okay, I guess I have been spending too much time in the U. _09-17Basically, if one wants primary car insurance from a U. Amex card, one has to enroll in the Amex Premium Car Rental Protection Plan, which charges a daily CDW fee (similar to what the rental car companies charge, only a bit less according to Amex) https://feeservices.... Looking at the Canadian rental car insurance docs (CIBC Visa Infinite, RBC Infinite Privilege) I see that it is primary coverage offered. Benefits are limited to one vehicle rental during any one period. For you maybe, but the CIBC Aero Gold Privilege card is worth it for me for the first year: $399 for 50k AP AC priority benefits (check-in, boarding, free bag) 6 Go Go passes (last year they gave me 12 for some reason) 6 Priority Pass passes 4 MLL passes. ge/One advantage of the Chase Sapphire Preferred Visa is that it comes with Primary car rental insurance. The Canadian Amex Platinum terms didn't use the term primary or secondary but it reads as though it is primary coverage on the Canadian Platinum Card, but not on the U. Looking at the Canadian rental car insurance docs (CIBC Visa Infinite, RBC Infinite Privilege) I see that it is primary coverage offered. I fly on paid AC Y more often than I would like, so the AC priority benefits have value to me. The Canadian Amex Platinum terms didn't use the term primary or secondary but it reads as though it is primary coverage on the Canadian Platinum Card, but not on the U. For someone who uses the perks, the CIBC Aero Gold Privilege card (and even the TD AP Privilege card) is certainly worth it. Beyond the first year, I agree with you, not worth it for most people. For you maybe, but the CIBC Aero Gold Privilege card is worth it for me for the first year: $399 for 50k AP AC priority benefits (check-in, boarding, free bag) 6 Go Go passes (last year they gave me 12 for some reason) 6 Priority Pass passes 4 MLL passes. I fly on paid AC Y more often than I would like, so the AC priority benefits have value to me. For someone who uses the perks, the CIBC Aero Gold Privilege card (and even the TD AP Privilege card) is certainly worth it. Beyond the first year, I agree with you, not worth it for most people. Either you have $200k household income or cibc doesn't check. And in some rare cases like yours who fly a lot of paid AC Y, yes it can be worth it. For anyone who can pay the $399-499 AF for a privilege card, a good competitor is the Amex Plat card. Get priority security lane, unlimited lounge access, travel credit and the bonus points. Right now Scotiabank is the only one who doesn’t have Visa Infinite Privilege card in Big Four Visa card issuers. Hopefully they can catch up soon and launch Scotia Momentum VISA Privilege or Scotiabank Passport VISA Privilege.


Credit card issuers are constantly innovating their reward programs to attract loyal consumers. The goal is to offer exceptional service to please the most discerning customers in hopes they will continue to spend big bucks through the brand. After all, Visa and Master Card make money on every swipe (or chip) transaction, so it pays to keep consumers spending on their cards. In Canada, Visa’s top loyalty program is called Visa Infinite. In this post we’ll review Visa Infinite and introduce the cards participating in the program. Visa’s top Canadian loyalty program has two variations: Visa Infinite, and Visa Infinite Privilege. Before we get into the benefits, let’s take a look at the income requirements for each: The Visa Infinite cards require a personal annual income of at least $60,000 or $100,000 per household. Infinite Privilege cards require a minimum annual income (personal or household) of $200,000. Clearly the Visa Infinite program is much more accessible for the average credit cardholder. For the average consumer, opting for a credit card with no annual fee and modest rewards is generally the way to go. But for people with high incomes (and spending budgets) a premium loyalty program is an obvious choice. The Visa Infinite and Infinite Privilege programs are largely targeted towards more affluent and established professionals. As such, the benefits of the program are tailored toward this group. At its core, Visa Infinite is all about the travel benefits. Through the Luxury Hotel Collection, Visa Infinite cardholders get exclusive access to perks when booking through There are over 900 worldwide properties including some of the most intriguing and prestigious hotels and resorts in the world. The following benefits come with every booking: Enjoy great food and fine wine in private, cozy dining settings. The Visa Infinite Dining Series offers wines selected by connoisseurs. Enjoy food served by world renowned chefs in Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto, Ottawa and Montreal. Get early access to sporting and entertainment tickets before the general public. Movie goers can enjoy advance tickets and access to the VIP lounge at TIFF. Other benefits include the Up Close & Personal Visa Infinite Music Series experiences and exclusive sports experiences for your favourite teams. Cardholders get access to their own personal concierge there to help them 24 hours a day, 7 days a week with. Get help booking travel, arranging car rentals, or other personal services. Your concierge can help get some flowers delivered ASAP! Most credit cards in the market today come with many of the following benefits. However, you will generally find these benefits are better than Platinum or other cards. Since each credit card can come with different benefits, you’ll need to read the fine print for the details for each category. For example, you might find select Visa Infinite cards come with higher travel insurance coverages. When you apply for a credit card, the bank will analyze your credit profile and determine what your credit limit will be. Visa Infinite cards come with credit limits of at least $20,000 or no pre-set spending limits at all. With higher credit limits comes increased income and credit requirements. In addition to the above benefits, Infinite Privilege cardholders get access to even more perks. The Visa Infinite and Visa Infinite Privilege loyalty programs are designed for savvy spenders who demand a higher level of service from their credit card issuer. With built in benefits for frequent travellers these cards can make any travel more convenient and more rewarding. The Visa Infinite program is only available with credit cards that carry an annual fee. As with any product or service, each individual must determine if there is enough value to offset the costs. Since Visa Infinite is built in to the card, be sure to look at the addition reward programs associated with these cards. For example, the Aeroplan, Avion, GM, and British Airways rewards programs are built on top of the Visa Infinite cards. With all the benefits, it’s easy to see the value in Visa Infinite cards. And with juicy sign-up bonuses and reduced annual fees, now’s a great time to step up to a premium credit card. ADVERTISING DISCLOSURE: Credit Cards has business relationships with some credit card issuers featured on this site. We may receive compensation from these issuers when consumers apply for and/or are approved for a credit card through links on this website. For example, when a visitor clicks on an “Apply Now” button, we may be compensated if that visitor is approved for a card. For benefits that go above and beyond rewards, both Mastercard and Visa offer their own respective programs to up the value you can get from your credit card. Mastercard offers the World and World Elite programs, while Visa offers the Visa Infinite and Infinite Privilege programs. Today, we’re going to compare them side by side, check out what they offer, and see who has the better program. Both Mastercard and Visa offer two levels within their programs. For Mastercard, they have: Each of them offer different levels of perks. For our exercise, we’ll be comparing World Elite and Visa Infinite cards, as they’re the closest to each other in terms of benefits. Here’s an overview of the basic benefits offered by World Elite Mastercards and Visa Infinite Privilege cards. Both programs have cards that offer membership to their lounge programs, but few of them offer actual passes. Because you normally have to pay an annual fee on top of your individual lounge access passes, you’re still saving quite a bit, even if the cards don’t come with passes (though it’s definitely better if they do). Select World Elite Mastercards offer membership to their own program – Mastercard Airport Experiences provided by Loungekey. This will give you membership to over 1,000 airport lounges worldwide, but only a select few cards offer complimentary passes. If your card doesn’t provide any free passes, you’ll have to pay $32 USD each time you want to use your lounge access. It comes with a Priority Pass membership and 6 free passes per year. For concierge service, both programs offer a full-service concierge to help with travel plans, dinner reservations, and event tickets. Mastercard World Elite concierge and Visa Infinite concierge are ready to help you with your travel plans, or even anything that comes up while you’re in the middle of your journey. When it comes to travel insurance, World Elite Mastercards have a slight edge. The differences between the 2 lie in the various rental car protections. World Elite Mastercards issued by BMO, MBNA & Brim Financial have car rental personal effects and accident insurances, something no Visa Infinite card currently offers. Otherwise, they generally have the same protections and coverage amounts. The best World Elite Mastercards come with 15 (out of To be able to acquire these cards, you need to meet set income requirements. In this regard, Visa Infinite cards definitely have a leg up on their competition. You need a personal income of $60,000 or a household income of $100,000 to qualify for a Visa Infinite card. While this may seem high on its own, they sound better than the income requirements for World Elite Mastercards, which increase those numbers to $80,000 personal or $150,000 household. Both programs offer access to events that can’t be found anywhere else. For Visa Infinite, you get the Visa Infinite Dining Series and Wine Country programs. The Dining Series gives you exclusive access to dining events that will make you want to get your camera out and show off to everyone. For the wine guru, the Wine Country program will let you participate in wine tastings and tours at a reduced cost compared to what anyone else has to pay. You’ll be able to pick from a wide variety of experiences and once-in-a-lifetime opportunities to events from all over the world. If you want to see more than just a show with Cirque du Soleil, Mastercard holders get access to exclusive perks like backstage access, 15% discount on Canadian shows, discounts at Las Vegas shows, and preferred seating. Above everything else we discussed, each program also has one special extra perk. For Visa Infinite, it’s the Luxury Hotel Collection. You’ll get great benefits at over 900 properties worldwide, such as a free room upgrade, $25 USD food or beverage voucher, VIP guest status, and more. On the World Elite Mastercard side, they offer Mastercard World Experiences. With this perk, you can get preferred access and complimentary upgrades on all kinds of offers, like upscale retailers and resorts . Using the genius rating as determined by our best networks pages for both Mastercard and Visa, here are the top options currently available. It offers the most amount of AIR MILES over any other AIR MILES card. First, it comes with a welcome bonus of up to 3,000 AIR MILES – 1,000 after your first purchase and another 2,000 after spending $3,000 in the first 3 months. And you earn 1 mile for every $10 spent on the card, plus double miles on National and Alamo car rentals. It also allows you to increase the value of every mile you earn. S., and you’ll need 15% fewer miles to get your flights. Throw in 14 types of insurance, and you’ve got a card that’s great for all your travels. To top it all off, the first year is currently free as well. You’ll earn Aeroplan miles on every purchase, and a sign-up bonus that starts after making your first purchase. And, for the first 3 months, you’ll also earn 5,000 bonus Aeroplan miles every month you spend $1,000 for a total of 15,000 miles earned. You also earn bonus miles on a variety of categories: These perks make a free flight even sweeter. And with 10 types of insurance, it still has plenty of coverage while you’re out and about. Let us know how your experience went in the comments below. It’s also offering a rebate on the annual fee for the first year, so you can take the card for a test drive. Regardless of the program, you’ll get great benefits that go beyond just rewards. Rbc infinite privilege rbc chicoutimi You must be an eligible Visa Infinite Privilege cardholder with a valid Visa Infinite Privilege card to take advantage of the Visa Infinite Privilege offers, benefits and services. Certain benefits and services require enrolment. Offers and benefits are non-transferable and discounts cannot be combined with any other offer or discount. The RBC Avion Visa Infinite Privilege is one of the few rewards cards to offer more than 1 point per dollar spent, coming in at 1.25 points per dollar spent. Any cards that gives more points than that will typically have much less valuable points. An RBC Avion Visa Infinite Privilege card has been issued at the request of the applicant or the co-applicant. An authorized user must be a permanent resident of Canada. Without looking at any of the perks (lounge access, concierge, etc.), and focusing strictly on the rewards: you get 1.25 points for every dollar spent vs. So, maximum return for a long-haul flight ($750 for 35,000 points) is 2.14% on the regular Infinite Avion and 2.68% on the Infinite Avion Privilege. If you spend a lot on your credit card, it's certainly worth it (over the regular Infinite Avion) even with the $280 difference in annual fees. It's possible that the Amex cards might be better for you depending on your spending. The Amex Platinum gives you 1.25 point on every dollar spent (and has lounge access perks plus a $200 travel credit which helps offset the $700 annual fee, and 50,000 points for signing up). The Amex Gold Rewards is very good as it gives you 2 points for every dollar spent on grocery/pharmacy/gas/travel, and 1 point for everything else, 25,000 points for signing up, but no lounge access. Both Amex cards can convert points to Aeroplan miles 1:1. Neither offer access to Maple Leaf Lounges though (neither does the Avion Infinite Privilege). The first question is, do you like your current "RBC Avion (plain) Infinite". That card is not the best out there, but it's good enough if you like RBC and do lots of banking with them. Notice that you earn points with the "Privilege" at a rate of 1.25, vs 1 for the plain. Also notice that your travel insurance coverage is much longer, and that your warranty coverage for purchases is also much longer. After running the numbers, I found it was worth it for that alone. The other stuff (free parking, etc.) is just nice extras. But the calculation will really depend of your individual circumstances. The RBC, or TD, or CIBC privilege cards, are NOT worth the $399 annual fee. Ill be booking some flights and hoping that this card does me some good... My brother-in-law was at CIBC to get the FYF aeropeso infinite card earlier this year. I found the break down of perks isn't the clearest. The first question is, do you like your current "RBC Avion (plain) Infinite". They gave it to him no problem (FYF), and even offered $200 off the privilege card if he wanted it. That card is not the best out there, but it's good enough if you like RBC and do lots of banking with them. Notice that you earn points with the "Privilege" at a rate of 1.25, vs 1 for the plain. Also notice that your travel insurance coverage is much longer, and that your warranty coverage for purchases is also much longer. After running the numbers, I found it was worth it for that alone. The other stuff (free parking, etc.) is just nice extras. But the calculation will really depend of your individual circumstances. In terms of rewards, the RBC cards are one of the worst. This card is supposed to earn you more RBC points than your average RBC card at 1.25 points per 1 dollar spent. A $100 retail gift card is valued at 14000 points meaning you need to spend $11200 to get a $100 gift card which is equivalent to 0.89% cashback. At $400 annual fee, that got to be the worst reward card ever. yourself to see if it's worth the additional $300 annual fee. As for the other perks and insurance, you can get the most important of them with a normal infinite Visa card with much better rewards/cashback such as the Scotia Momentum Infinite or CIBC Dividend Infinite with only $100 annual fee. In terms of rewards, the RBC cards are one of the worst. This card is supposed to earn you more RBC points than your average RBC card at 1.25 points per 1 dollar spent. A $100 retail gift card is valued at 14000 points meaning you need to spend $11200 to get a $100 gift card which is equivalent to 0.89% cashback. At $400 annual fee, that got to be the worst reward card ever. As for the other perks and insurance, you can get the most important of them with a normal infinite Visa card with much better rewards/cashback such as the Scotia Momentum Infinite or CIBC Dividend Infinite with only $100 annual fee. If you are using your RBC points to buy retail gift cards, then I totally agree with you. However, if you are using your card for travel booked with RBC, then the return is significantly higher. A short haul flight costs 15,000 RBC rewards points, and it's worth up to $350, so using the regular Infinite Avion, that's a return of up to 2.33%, and using the Infinite Privilege Avion it's up to 2.92%. So if you spend a lot on your card, and use your points for travel, the return is very high, even when factoring in the high annual fee. Plus the sign-up bonus could be worth as much as $583. The way I see it, the Privilege card is worth it over the regular Infinite Avion if you spend more than $95,000 annually on your card, or more than $55,000 in the first year if you cancel it before the second year. (And that's strictly on reward points, i.e., not factoring in the value of any of the other perks, if you use them.) If you are using your RBC points to buy retail gift cards, then I totally agree with you. However, if you are using your card for travel booked with RBC, then the return is significantly higher. A short haul flight costs 15,000 RBC rewards points, and it's worth up to $350, so using the regular Infinite Avion, that's a return of up to 2.33%, and using the Infinite Privilege Avion it's up to 2.92%. So if you spend a lot on your card, and use your points for travel, the return is very high, even when factoring in the high annual fee. Plus the sign-up bonus could be worth as much as $583. The way I see it, the Privilege card is worth it over the regular Infinite Avion if you spend more than $95,000 annually on your card, or more than $55,000 in the first year if you cancel it before the second year. (And that's strictly on reward points, i.e., not factoring in the value of any of the other perks, if you use them.) The comparison with flights is difficult because of variability of ticket prices, But even so, I just did a test right now. For a Toronto-New York round trip, RBC tells me it cost 25,456 points or CAD $254.56 per person total (with West Jet). That's equivalent to $20364.80 that needs to be spent on this RBC Avion Infinite Privilege card to get this. This is still 1.25% cashback equivalent, hardly anything extraordinary. The cashback % would be even worst for the normal Avion Infinite (1%). For a fee card at $400/year, I would look somewhere else with more flexibility (RBC West Jet World Elite Master Card?